Skycatch Director of Engineering is pictured here in the Valley Life Sciences Building (VLSB) at UC Berkeley.

Skycatch Director of Engineering is pictured here in the Valley Life Sciences Building (VLSB) at UC Berkeley.

On February 16, the Skycatch team met with members of UC Berkeley’s Paleontology and Archaeology departments to discuss how drones might play a greater role in their respective research and the development of their fieldwork. Their work focuses on conservation, paleoecology, and how flora and fauna have responded to climate changes and historical human activities, helping to inform conservation efforts in the face of modern global change. Discussion points varied from the possibility of recurring remote flights at once inhabited caves to use cases such as high-resolution time lapses taken during the excavation of fossilized remains.

 The Skycatch team participates in an open discussion with UC Berkeley's Paleontology and Archeology departments.


The Skycatch team participates in an open discussion with UC Berkeley’s Paleontology and Archeology departments.

Skycatch’s David Chen and Jon Thompson met with Dr. Emily Lindsey, Dr. Jun Sunseri, and Dr. Tony Barnosky among others to identify how Skycatch can assist and open new opportunities in their field. As expected, the interplay of science and technology spurred shared curiosity and a range of innovative solutions, such as the feasibility to map the distribution of animal excrement near watering holes to determine animal migration and behavioral patterns.

Skycatch looks forward to working with the UC Berkeley teams to help improve their research and gather critical data. Skycatch is honored to collaborate with the brilliant minds bringing about a smarter, more informed, and socially-conscious future with aerial data visualization tools.